"Türkmanlar" səhifəsinin versiyaları arasındakı fərqlər

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{{Xalq
|adı = Türkmanlar
|şəkil = [[File:Flag_of_Iraqi_TurkmansFlag of Iraqi Turkmans.pngsvg|250px]]
|şəklin izahı =
|ümumi sayı = 3 000 000<ref name="unpo-pr-ir-turk-2.7.15">"Iraqi Turkmen — Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO)". İstifadə tarixi: 2 iyul 2015. Yenilənmə tarixi: 11 mart, 2015–ci il. Arxivləşdirilib. Arxivləşdirilimiş profil broşürası (PDF). {{en}}{{oq|en|The Iraqi Turkmen are a community of around 3 million, predominantly present in the Iraqi provinces of Mosul, Erbil, Kerkuk, Salahaddin and Diya, Baghdad and Wasit. They represent the third largest ethnic group in Iraq (13% of the population) and, since 29 July 2012, they are officially recognized by the Iraqi Parliament as one of the three main ethnic components of the country’s population. Kerkuk is considered by the Turkmen as their capital city.}}</ref><br/>600.000 – 2.000.000 (2003)<ref>"Iraq: Turkomans — Minority Rights Group International". İstifadə tarixi: 29 iyun 2015. Yenilənmə tarixi: Oktyabr, 2014–cü il. Arxivləşdirilib. {{en}}{{oq|en|The Iraqi Turkomans claim to be the third largest ethnic group in Iraq, residing almost exclusively in the north, in an arc of towns and villages stretching from Tel Afar, west of Mosul, through Mosul, Erbil, Altun Kopru, Kirkuk, Tuz Khurmatu, Kifri and Khaniqin. Before the war that began in March 2003, there were anything between 600,000 and 2 million Turkomans, the former figure being the conservative estimate of outside observers and the latter a Turkoman claim.}}</ref><br/>800.000 (2001–2003)<ref>Minorities in disputed territories in northern Iraq, page 18. // [http://www.minorityrights.org/download.php@id=280 Assimilation, Exodus, Eradication: Iraq’s minority communities since 2003]. Author: Preti Taneja. London: Minority Rights Group International, 2007, 44 pages. ISBN 1904584608 {{oq|en|Iraqi Turkomans numbered around 800 000 in 2001, <small><u>'''118'''</u></small> and live in towns and villages in northern Iraq stretching from Tel Afar, to Mosul, Erbil, Altun, Kirkuk, Tuz Hurmatu, Kifri and Khaniqin.}}</ref><ref>Notes, page 37. // Assimilation, Exodus, Eradication: Iraq’s minority communities since 2003. Author: Preti Taneja. London: Minority Rights Group International, 2007, 44 pages. ISBN 1904584608 {{oq|en|<small><u>'''118'''</u></small> MRG, World Directory of Minorities, 2001, p. 349: ‘the former figure being the conservative estimate of outside observers and the latter a Turkoman claim’.}}</ref><ref>Part One: General Information. — Chapter I. Overview. — 11. Ethnic groups and languages, page 12–13. // [https://books.google.az/books?id=DhJ3lRnXyXcC&hl=ru&source=gbs_navlinks_s Iraq Then and Now: A Guide to the Country and Its People]. Authors: Karen Dabrowska, Geoff Hann. [[:en:Chalfont St Peter|Chalfont St Peter]]: [[:en:Bradt Travel Guides|Bradt Travel Guide]], 2008, 371 pages. ISBN 9781841622439{{oq|en|The Iraqi people were once like a necklace, where the thread of nationality united a variety of unique and colourful beads. The Arabs are in the majority, making up at least 75% of the population, while 18% are Kurds and the remaining 7% consists of Assyrians, Turcomans, Armenians and other, smaller minorities.<br/>A report by Minority Rights Group İnternational revealed that Iraq's minorities, which consist of some of the oldest communities in the world, are fleeing because of the violence unleashed against them. They tend to be identified with the occupation and are seen as easy targets by kidnappers and death squads. Before 2003 there were 30,000 Mandeans in Iraq. Today there are fewer then 13,000. The figures for the Turcomans are 800,000 in 2003 now down to 200,000; Jews from few hundred to 35; Palestinians from 35,000 to 15,000. The Yezidis number 550,000.}}</ref><br/>600.000 (1997)<ref>Chapter 11. A War Within a War, page 112. // [https://books.google.az/books?id=9wYwXp_num0C&hl=ru&source=gbs_navlinks_s Losing Iraq: Inside the Postwar Reconstruction Fiasco]. Author: David L. Phillips. Reprinted edition. Hardcover first published in 2005 by Westview Press. [[:en:New York City|New York]]: [[:en:Basic Books|Basic Books]], 2014, 304 pages. ISBN 9780786736201 {{oq|en|Behind the Arabs and the Kurds, Turkmen are the third-largest ethnic group in Iraq. The ITF claim Turkmen represent 12 percent of Iraq's population. In response, the Kurds point to the 1997 census which showed that there were only 600,000 Turkmen.}}</ref>
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